Category: Christmas

Christmas themed science activities – who said the holidays can’t be educational too?

Stunning winter or indoor snow day craft that doubles as a cool crystal science lesson – how to make salt crystal paper snowflakes!

Salt Crystal Paper Snowflakes - crystal science project for kids 1

OK, I think I’m slightly addicted to making salt crystal crafts – we began with our ‘snowy’ salt crystal fir trees, then we made our salt crystal ghosts, and now salt crystal snowflakes! I think these snowflakes are my favourite so far: they’re quite stunning, and I love science projects that only need everyday household materials – no need to duck to the shops first!

Salt Crystal Snowflakes 8

Suitable for

This is would be a great activity for a group middle schoolers (8-10 year olds), who should be able to do most aspects by themselves. Younger kids (even preschoolers) can try this too, but they’ll need more help. (The salt crystal part is easy enough, but it’s actually the folding and cutting of the paper snowflakes that little kids will need the most help with). For reference, Jewel was 9 and Bumble Bee 7 when we did this.

Salt Crystal Snowflakes 13

How to make Salt Crystal Snowflakes

Read More Salt Crystal Paper Snowflakes!

What’s the best way to make crystal snowflakes? Try this crafty winter science experiment for kids.

Make your own crystal snowflakes at home - Go Science Kids

Making crystal snowflakes seems to be the ‘classic’ Borax crystal science project. I’ve seen it in a bunch of places (like here, here, here, and here), but everyone seems to do it slightly differently. Some leave their snowflakes white. Some use coloured pipe cleaners. Some add food colouring to the solution. (And I’d heard of a fourth technique used to make crystal rocks, which I was super keen to try out with snowflakes to see if it worked!)

So, being a science family, we decided to do a little comparison experiment at home, to see which technique yielded the best looking crystal snowflakes.

Suitable for

Generally I’d recommend this activity for primary (elementary) aged kids (ie 7-9 year olds). Younger kids (5-6 year olds) may like to try it too, with assistance. My kids first made Borax crystals when they were 4 year olds, BUT they fully understood the need to take safety precautions and not put any Borax in their mouth. Please see safety notes at the bottom of this post when judging if this activity is right for your child.

Four ways to make crystal snowflakes

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We used:

  • 6mm furry pipe cleaners in white and navy blue (also called chenille stems)
  • invisible nylon thread and scissors
  • Borax powder
  • 4 wide mouth jars (or, more accurately,  we used 3 jars and 1 tumbler – as I didn’t have a 4th matching jar…)
  • boiling water
  • spoons for stirring
  • pencils or chopsticks for balancing on top
  • paper (optional)
  • safety glasses (optional, but recommended. We have these ones.)

Pipecleaner snowflakes - Go Science Kids

1. Create pipe cleaner snowflakes by cutting and twisting the pipe cleaners. We used about 1.5 pipe cleaners per snowflake. Please bear in mind that snowflakes are always six-sided. Your snowflakes also need to be small and narrow enough to be able to easy dangle inside your containers, without touching the sides or bottom. We made 3 x white and 1 x blue snowflake.

2. Tie on a loop of nylon thread to one of the snowflake arms of each snowflake. This will be used to dangle the snowflake inside the jar (and also doubles as a handy ornament hanger later on).

3. (Please see safety notes at the bottom of the post before starting this step.) Fill your jars with boiling water. Add Borax powder and stir. Keep adding Borax until the solution becomes super saturated and you can’t add any more without Borax powder settling on the bottom of the jar. We used about four tablespoons of Borax powder per jar.

4. Add blue food colouring to just one the jars.

5. Loop your snowflakes over pencils (or chopsticks), to balance on top of the jars. Add a white snowflake to the jar with the blue food colouring, and the other snowflakes to the remaining jars. You can also add paper covers if you wish, by cutting out a circle slightly larger than the jar diameter, and cutting a radial line for the thread to pass through.

Making Borax Crystal Snowflakes - Go Science Kids

6. Leave for 24 hours (or longer). The solution will be cloudy at first, but will start to clear after about an hour. You can start to see small crystals forming, and they’ll continue to grow for the next couple of days.

How to make Borax crystal snowflakes - Go Science Kid

7. Remove the snowflakes from the solutions. You should now have a blue crystal snowflake (the food colouring one), a second blue crystal snowflake (the blue pipe cleaner one), and two white snowflakes.

Crystal Snowflakes

8. Here’s where we tried out the special new technique! Use watercolour paints to paint one of the white crystal snowflakes blue, and watch how the crystals absorb the colour towards the centre of the structure – it’s fascinating! (Thanks Happy Hooligans for the inspiration!)

Watercolour Blue Crystal Snowflake

Below is a pic of the watercolour painted crystal after it’s had a chance to dry. Can you see how the large outer crystals have remained largely transparent, and that the blue colour has snuck in through the little crevasses, in towards the pipecleaner at the centre of the crystal structure? This is a great way to demonstrate how moisture can seep though rocks. SO AWESOME!

I’m so excited about this new technique – we’re definitely going to try this again!

Crystal painted with watercolour paints

But, ahem, getting back to our original question – what’s the best way to make crystal snowflakes?

Let’s compare.

Below is how they all look being held up to the window. (Top left = watercolour, top right = food colouring, bottom left = blue pipe cleaner, and bottom right = control / plain white.

Crystal snowflake collage

And here’s how they look outside in the sun. (The water colour one is the bottom right, and the food colouring one is bottom left.) I love how they all sparkle in the light!

Four crystal snowflakes in the sunshine

And here’s how they look on the coffee table inside. (You can tell the watercolour one by now right? It is at the top.)

Winter science craft for kids - how to make crystal snowflakes (experiment _ tutorial)

Crystal snowflakes - science craft for kids

The verdict?

For me, the watercolour snowflake wins, hands down. Not only are you able to choose the colour that you want more easily (as you can choose from the whole watercolour pallet), but the way the paint is absorbed through the crystal structure is both fascinating AND beautiful!

Fun Science

Borax (also known as sodium borate, sodium tetraborate or disodium tetraborate) is a naturally occurring mineral and salt, that is mined from seasonal lakes. Borax has numerous industrial uses. It is often dissolved in water to form an alkaline antiseptic solution that is used as a disinfectant, detergent, and water softener (which is why you can often find it in the laundry aisle. Or you can also find it online).

When you stir Borax into very hot water, you can see that the water becomes very cloudy. This is because the Borax molecules become suspended in the water. As the water cools to room temperature, the solution becomes super saturated, and Borax separates from the water molecules and attaches to whatever it can, including the sides of the jar, and the pipe cleaner decoration dangling inside, forming beautiful translucent crystals.

Borax crystals are generally well formed and quite large, although you won’t typically find them in jewellery or in museum displays. This is because the crystals won’t hold their structure over long periods of time, like other crystals would. Because they are a salt, they go through a process called efflorescence. Dehydration causes the translucent crystals to become opaque, and eventually crumble into a white powder. (This is just starting to happen to the Borax crystal flowers we made almost 2 years ago, with a dusting of powdern just starting to appearing on the surface of the crystals).

Making crystal snowflakes would be a great winter science project, but as it happens, we made ours just before Christmas, and Christmas falls in summer-time in Australia! Snowflakes in summer? Ha! I guess somehow Christmas and snow are intrinsically linked, even for us down-under! (If you are interested, you can find more Christmas science projects here.)

Homemade crystal ornaments do look amazing hanging on your Christmas tree. (I have some pics of them on the tree, but they’re still on my camera. I’ll add them when I get a chance!)

We went a bit crystal crazy this year – it seems we’ve amassed quite a DIY Christmas crystal decorations collection! (And this pic below doesn’t even include the crystal candy canes that we made last year!)

DIY Crystal Christmas Decorations!

You can see all our crystal activities on Crystal Science page. Yes, we are officially crystal-obsessed. 🙂

While we are on the topic, just a quick note about storage. Because Borax is a salt, the crystals will eventually dehydrate, and start to crumble back into a white (or perhaps blue!) powder. This is a slow process – but it is starting to happen to some crystals we made about 2 years ago, and I’d like our Christmas crystals to last longer than that! So, in an attempt to slow down this process, I’m trialing storing our crystal Christmas ornaments in a zip lock bag between seasons to prevent moisture loss. I’ll let you know how they go!

Safety notes…

Be careful with boiling water around young kids. Place the glass jars down on a table before adding boiling water – glass with boiling water inside will quickly become too hot to hold.

Borax is a commonly used natural ingredient in grade school science experiments, and is safe for older kids to handle when used responsibly. It is not edible however, and will irritate if put directly into eyes. It is also a mild skin irritant for people with sensitive skin. Treat it like you would handing laundry powder. I recommend wearing safety glasses, using spoons, and washing hands afterwards.

With Borax being inedible, please be mindful of who might be able to reach your crystals afterwards. Make sure that your crystal creations are stored out of possible reach of babies, toddlers or pets. We hang ours up high on our Christmas tree, and store them in zip lock bags in our Christmas box in the garage for the rest of the year.

All kids’ activities on this blog require attentive adult supervision. Parents and carers will need to judge whether a particular activity is appropriate their child’s age and skill level. Click here for more information.

Make your own DIY crystal snowflakes at home - Go Science Kids
You might also be interested in our Go Science Kids and Crystal Science boards on Pinterest.

And, of course, you can always subscribe to our newsletter, to receive all our latest activities straight in your Inbox. We’d love to have you join us!

* This post contains affiliate link(s) to similar products used. An affiliate link means I may earn a referral fee or commission if you make a purchase through my link, without any extra cost to you. Thank you for your support.

How to make a Borax crystal snowman ornament – cute winter or Christmas ‘science craft’ idea for kids.

Crystal Snowman Square

Yes, another crystal ornament post! My kids keep asking to make more, and I’m happy to oblige…

I know I’m mentioned this before, but I’ve found that repeating activities, with slight variations, is really worthwhile. If the kids are continuing to show an interest in something, that’s a sure sign there’s still more learning to be had!

So when my daughter Bumble Bee begged to make a crystal snowman, so she could hang one on our Christmas tree….

Make your own sparkly crystal snowman - fun crystal science craft for kids

Suitable for

Generally I’d recommend this activity for primary (elementary) aged kids (7-9 year olds). Younger kids (5-6 year olds) may like to try it too, with assistance.

You’ll see in the pictures below that I did this activity with my 4 year old daughter, BUT she had a lot of help from me. Bee’s also watched her big sister do this activity several times before, and so understood the steps involved and the need to follow instructions for safety.

How to make a Borax crystal snowman

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We used:

Ingredients to make crystal snowmen

What to do:

1. Twist a white pipe cleaner into two connected circles, making a snowman shape. Add a black pipe cleaner hat, trimming as necessary.

2. Tie a loop of invisible nylon thread to the middle of the snowman’s hat. (Nylon thread is tricky to tie for little hands. You can also use dental floss – which doesn’t look as good, but is much easier to tie on). Check that the snowman can easily dangle inside the glass without touching the bottom or sides.

Making a Borax crystal snowman

These next steps require adult supervision. (See safety notes below.)

3. Put on safety glasses. Fill a glass with boiling water. (Careful – the glass will become very hot!) Add Borax powder to the water, and stir. (Note: Borax is not taste-safe.)

Creating a Borax super-saturated solution

The actual quantity of Borax required will depend on the volume of your glass – allow for about 3-4 tablespoons per 250ml of water.

You’ll see the water become cloudy, but keep adding and stirring until it’s super-saturated and you can’t stir in any more without Borax powder collecting on the bottom.

Stirring Borax into hot water

4. Thread the nylon loop through a chopstick (or pencil) and lower the snowman into the Borax suspension, balancing the chopstick on top. Double check that it isn’t touching the sides or bottom off the glass. Set aside for 24 hours (or longer). Notice that the solution in the glass goes from cloudy, to relatively clear, to encrusted with crystals!

Three stages of making Borax crystal snowmen

5. When the crystals have stopped growing, remove the snowman from the glass, rinse and let dry. Now you have a new crystal snowman ornament to hang (up high) on your Christmas tree!

How to make a crystal snowman - fun chemistry for kids

I love studying the crystals afterwards. Every crystal formation is unique. So pretty!

Crystals

And they sparkle like crazy in the sunshine!

Borax crystal snowman

Fun Science

Borax (also known as sodium borate, sodium tetraborate or disodium tetraborate) is a naturally occurring mineral and salt, that is mined from seasonal lakes. Borax has numerous industrial uses. It is often dissolved in water to form an alkaline antiseptic solution that is used as a disinfectant, detergent, and water softener (which is why you can often find it in the laundry aisle. Or you can also find it online).

When you stir Borax into very hot water, you can see that the water becomes very cloudy. This is because the Borax molecules become suspended in the water. As the water cools to room temperature, the solution becomes super saturated, and Borax separates from the water molecules and attaches to whatever it can, including the sides of the jar, and the pipe cleaner decoration dangling inside, forming beautiful translucent crystals.

Borax crystals are generally well formed and quite large, although you won’t typically find them in jewellery or in museum displays. This is because the crystals won’t hold their structure over long periods of time, like other crystals would. Because they are a salt, they go through a process called efflorescence. Dehydration causes the translucent crystals to become opaque, and eventually crumble into a white powder. (This is just starting to happen to the Borax crystal flowers we made almost 1.5 years ago, with a dusting of powder starting to appearing on the surface of the now opaque crystals).

How to make a crystal snowman ornament - cute science craft for kids

Safety notes…

Be careful with boiling water around young kids. Have kids place the glass on a surface before adding boiling water – glass with boiling water inside will become too hot to handle almost instantly.

Borax is a commonly used natural ingredient in grade school science experiments, and is safe for older kids to handle when used responsibly. It is not edible however, and will irritate if put directly into eyes. It is also a mild skin irritant for people with sensitive skin. I recommend using safety glasses and washing hands afterwards.

With Borax being inedible, please make sure that your crystal creations are stored out of reach of babies, toddlers or pets (or hung high up, well out of reach, on your Christmas tree.)

All kids’ activities on this blog require attentive adult supervision. Parents and carers will need to judge whether a particular activity is appropriate their child’s age and skill level. Click here for more information.

Crystal snowman

For more DIY crystal ideas, we have a bunch listed on our Crystals page, including:

You might also be interested in our Go Science Kids and Crystal Science boards on Pinterest.

And, of course, you can always subscribe to our newsletter, to receive all our latest activities straight in your Inbox. We’d love to have you join us!

* This post contains affiliate link(s) to similar products used. An affiliate link means I may earn a referral fee or commission if you make a purchase through my link, without any extra cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Can you add jingle bells to a paper plate  Christmas tree, without using glue? Fun physics challenge for kids.

Magnetic jingle bell tree - Christmas science fun for kids

Suitable for

I’d suggest this activity for preschoolers or kindergarteners. Bumble Bee was 4 years old when we did this.

Don’t you just love it when one activity spins into another? That’s what happened with our jingle bell tree.

It all started while we were making our Christmas tree magnet maze. My first thought was that we could use a metal jingle bell to trace the magnet maze instead of a metallic ball. Because, you know, jingle bells make everything more awesome.

Meanwhile Bumble Bee had started drawing her own paper plate Christmas tree, and was really focused on colouring it in neatly. (Personally I don’t mind if she colours outside the lines, but I was impressed by her self-motivated focus and effort – traits I like to encourage.)

Drawing a Christmas Tree

With all that neat colouring, she’d neglected to leave any white space for baubles, and I knew if she tried to draw any later, they would appear dull and dark because of the yellow marker underneath. I was concerned she’d feel disappointed, especially considering how hard she’d tried, so I privately brainstormed alternatives. Perhaps she could draw ornaments on another piece of paper, cut them out and glue them on?

And then I thought, “Woah – wouldn’t these metal jingle bells look great as ‘hanging’ ornaments!”

So, when she’d finished colouring, I asked “What do you think about decorating your tree with jingle bells for baubles? Can you think of a way you could make them stick, without using glue?”

Apparently she could. 🙂Adding bells to the tree
 

Magnetic Jingle Bell Tree

Similar to our magnet mazes, this activity encourages kids to think about the physics of magnetic force, and in particular, of magnetic force through an object.

Here’s how Bumble Bee’s jingle bell tree turned out!

Christmas magnet science for kids - make a jingle bell tree

And here’s the back, revealing all her magnet secrets!

Magnetic force holding the bells onto the christmas tree

Bumble Bee used some of our Geomag magnetic rods (aff link*). But other similar large magnets would also work as well.

Related: You can see our previous reviews of Geomag sets here and here.

Please note…

I recommend using a large-sized magnet. The ones we used here are a few inches long, and not easily swallowed. Smaller magnets that could potentially be swallowed are particularly dangerous if swallowed concurrently with other magnets, or items attracted to magnets (like jingle bells), as they could attract each other inside the gut and cause serious injuries. You know your child. Use your best judgement, and please supervise at all times.

Magnetic force holding the bells onto the christmas tree

Fun Science

Gravity is an invisible force. It pulls objects towards the earth. You can see the affect it has on objects. Normally if you place a little jingle bell on a paper plate, and tip the paper plate up, the bell will roll off the side of the plate and onto the floor.

A magnet is something that produces another invisible force, called magnetic force. You can see the push or pull affect it has on objects. If you bring a metal object, like a bell, near a magnet, the magnetic force attracts the bell and makes it move towards the magnet.

Magnetic force works through some objects, like paper plates. If you have a bell on a paper plate, and a magnet on the other side, and you tip the paper plate up, the bell has two forces working on it: gravity, which is trying to make the bell fall to the floor, and magnetic force, which is trying to attract the bell to the magnet. If the magnetic force is greater than the gravitational force, the bell won’t fall.

Because of the artistic element of kids being able to design and decorate their Christmas tree any way they like, I’m going to call this a STEAM (or STEM + Art) activity. You can read more about STEAM activities here.

Check out our physics page for more physics fun, including:

We also have lots more Christmas science ideas, including:

If you’re on Pinterest, check out our Christmas Science Projects for Kids board.

While you’re there, you might also like to follow our main Go Science Kids board, and our Fun Science for Kids and STEM for Girls boards too. We’re always pinning awesome science stuff!

And, of course, you can always subscribe to our newsletter, to receive all our latest activities straight in your Inbox. We’d love to have you join us!

* This post contains affiliate link(s). An affiliate link means I may earn a referral fee or commission if you make a purchase through my link, without any extra cost to you. It helps to keep this little project afloat. Thank you for your support. Please note: I was not obligated to write this post or mention any particular product. All opinions are my, or my kids’ own.

How to make cute crystal holly ornaments – cute Christmas science craft project for kids.

How to make a crystal holly ornament - cute Christmas science craft for kids

 

Remember how I mentioned we have a bunch of new DIY crystal decorations to share for Christmas? This next one was a special request from my 4 year old – crystal holly!

 

 

Suitable for

I’d recommend this activity for primary (elementary) school aged kids. Younger kids (5-6 year olds) could also give it a try, with assistance. This was too tricky for my 4 year old, but she watched with earnest, assisting where she could.

We made these in much the same way that we made our crystal Christmas trees earlier. I’ll repeat the main steps below.

 

 

How to make crystal Holly Christmas Ornaments

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You’ll need:

 

What to do:

1. Fold the green pipe cleaner in half. This middle point will become the tip of one of the holly leaves. Bend into a holly leaf shape, twist the two sides together at about the midway point, and the bend the remaining section into a second holly leaf shape, twisting the ends together to finish.

2. Twist the red pipe cleaner around the middle of your two holly leaves, and bend into several holly berry shapes.

Pipe cleaner holly

3. Tie a loop of invisible nylon thread to the end of one of your holly leaves. Thread this loop onto a chopstick (or pencil), and check that the holly can easily dangle inside the jar with the chopstick balancing on top.

4. These next steps require adult supervision. (See safety notes below). Put on safety glasses. Fill a glass jar with boiling water. (Careful – the glass jar will become very hot!) Add Borax powder to the water, and stir. (Note: Borax is not taste-safe.)

Stirring Borax

The Borax will become suspended (ie, it will won’t settle on the bottom of the jar.) The actual quantity of Borax required will depend on the volume of your jar – allow for about 3 tablespoons per 250ml of water. Or just keep adding and stirring until you’ve saturated the mixture and you start to see Borax collect on the bottom.

 

5. Lower the holly into the Borax suspension, balancing the chopstick on top. Double check that the holly isn’t touching the jar. Set aside in a safe place until the next day (or longer).

Making crystal holly ornaments

 

6. When the crystals have stopped growing, remove the holly from the jar, slide the nylon loop off the chopstick, rinse your holly and let dry.

Now you have a new crystal holly ornament to hang (up high) on your Christmas tree!

DIY crystal holly ornament from Borax and pipe cleaners

 

 

Safety notes…

Be very careful with boiling water around young kids. Glass jars with boiling water inside will almost instantly become too hot to hold.

Borax is a commonly used natural ingredient in grade school science experiments, and is safe for older kids to handle when used responsibly. It is not edible however, and will irritate if put into eyes. It is also a mild skin irritant for people with sensitive skin. I recommend using safety glasses and washing hands afterwards.

With Borax being inedible, please make sure that your crystal creations are stored out of reach of babies, toddlers or pets (or hung high up, well out of reach, on your Christmas tree.)

All kids’ activities on this blog require attentive adult supervision. Parents and carers will need to judge whether a particular activity is appropriate their child’s age and skill level. Click here for more information.

 

I just love studying the crystals afterwards. Every crystal formation is unique. And all are pretty!

Studying the Borax crystals

Plus, they sparkle in the sunshine or under lights! It’s hard to capture in the photos – but believe me, it was glinting like crazy!

crystal holly ornamentsparkling DIY crystal holly ornament

 

 

 

Fun Science

Borax (also known as sodium borate, sodium tetraborate or disodium tetraborate) is a naturally occurring mineral and salt, that is mined from seasonal lakes. It is commonly used as a detergent alternative or laundry booster, and so you should be able to find it in the laundry aisle of your local grocery store (or you can also buy it online).

If you mix a small quantity of Borax with water, it will become suspended, which means that the water molecules can ‘hold’ onto it for a while, before eventually settling to the bottom of the jar.

If you heat up the water however, the water molecules move further apart, allowing more room for extra Borax to be suspended. As the water cools, the water molecules come closer together again, and can’t hold onto the same quantity of Borax as before. This is called supersaturation. The extra Borax separates from the water molecules and sticks to the pipe cleaners, forming beautiful crystals.

 

 

For more Christmas science ideas, check out our Christmas Science Projects & Experiments page, including:

 

You might also be interested in our Go Science Kids and Crystal Science boards on Pinterest.

 

And, of course, you can always subscribe to our newsletter, to receive all our latest activities straight in your Inbox. We’d love to have you join us!

 

* This post contains affiliate link(s) to similar products used. An affiliate link means I may earn a referral fee or commission if you make a purchase through my link, without any extra cost to you. It helps to keep this little project afloat. Thank you so much for your support.

Christmas STEAM activity:  design your own Christmas tree magnet maze game! Fun way for kids to learn about physics and magnetism through play.

Make a Christmas tree magnet game - fun science for kids

Remember the magnet maze game we made a little while ago? This Christmas tree magnet maze game is essentially the same thing, but with a fun Christmas spin!

My kids really enjoy repeating an activity with minor variations. It gives us a chance to play around with a concept, and perhaps think a little deeper about it than we may have the first time round.

This Christmas tree magnet maze activity explores the physics of magnetic force through an object, and how we could use this force to move a ball along a particular path.

Design a Christmas tree magnet maze - Christmas STEAM activity for kids

The artistic element of kids being able to design and decorating their Christmas tree any way they like, helps this activity cross the curriculum to incorporate both science & art. Incorporating art into STEM subjects is a great way for kids to use both sides of the brain, and encourages creative kids to enjoy and engage with STEM subjects.

Related: Click here to read more about integrating STEM + Art to make STEAM.

Suitable for

I’d suggest this activity for preschoolers or kindergarteners. Bumble Bee was 4 years old when we did this activity.

Please note…

Only try this activity if your child no longer puts things in their mouth, as the small balls are a choking hazard.

Either way, I recommend using a large-sized magnet. The ones we used here are a few inches long, and not easily swallowed. Smaller magnets that could potentially be swallowed are particularly dangerous if swallowed concurrently with other magnets, or items attracted to magnets, as they can attract each other inside the gut and cause all sorts of nasty problems.

You know your child. Use your best judgement, and please supervise at all times.

How to make  A Christmas Tree Magnet Maze Game

You’ll need:

  • paper plates (or thin cardboard)
  • markers
  • a large magnet
  • small steel ball (or other steel object)

We used Stix markers and Geomag magnetic rods and steel balls (affiliate links*) as that’s what we have at home. But other similar products would also work as well.

Related: You can see our previous reviews of Geomag sets here and here.

What to do:

  1. Design and decorate your Christmas tree!
  2. Put a steel ball on the maze side of the paper plate, and the magnet on the other.
  3. Move the magnet underneath. Magnetic force will make the ball move too!

Decorating a Christmas tree

I drew a Christmas tree outline onto a paper plate, to give Bumble Bee an idea of what she could do. I encouraged her to draw her own. But, rightly or wrongly, Bumble Bee decided she didn’t want to draw her own, and instead adopted the tree outline that I’d drawn as hers. (I didn’t insist, as then I would have had a battle on my hands!) She did happily decorate ‘her’ tree though, with lots of purple baubles!

Once her decorations were complete, she carefully placed the ball on the top side of the plate, whilst holding the magnet underneath, until the ball was ‘caught’ in the magnet’s magnetic field and stopped rolling around.

Christmas magnet play for kids

She then held the plate in one hand, and moved the magnet underneath to make the ball move along the Christmas tree outline.

DIY Christmas tree magnet maze STEAM activity for kids

It’s actually quite tricky for young kids to move the ball along a set path, as it requiring kids to use their sense of proprioception (or awareness of their body in space), which is one of our seven senses.

(Yes, we have seven senses! Read briefly about them here.)

In order to move the ball around the maze, kids need to use their sense of proprioception to judge where to move their hand, and how much force to use to push the ball along the path, without actually seeing their hand moving, only the ball.

Don’t be surprised if it takes some children a few tries before they get the hang of it.

Christmas tree magnet maze

Fun Science

Gravity is a force. It pulls objects towards the earth. It’s an invisible force, but you can see the affect it has on objects. Normally if you have a metal ball on a paper plate, and you tip the paper plate up, the ball will roll off the side of the plate and onto the floor.

A magnet is something that produces another force, called magnetic force. This magnetic force is also invisible, but you can see the affect it has on objects. If you bring a metal ball near a magnet, the magnetic force will attract the ball and make it move towards the magnet. Magnetic force works through some objects, like paper plates. If you have a metal ball on a paper plate, and a magnet on the other side, and you tip the paper plate up, the ball has two forces working on it: gravity, which is trying to make the ball fall to the floor, and magnetic force, which is trying to attract the ball to the magnet. If your magnet is strong enough, magnetic force will win.

Extension Idea: Older kids might be able to use IT to design their own Christmas Tree mazes, which they could then print out and glue onto a paper plate or cardboard.  This would be a great way to incorporate technology into this activity, another of the STEM pillar subjects.

For more physics fun, you might like:

We also have lots more Christmas science ideas, including:

If you’re on Pinterest, check out our Christmas Science Projects for Kids board.

While you’re there, you might also like to follow our main Go Science Kids board, and our Fun Science for Kids and STEM for Girls boards too. We’re always pinning awesome science stuff!

And, of course, you can always subscribe to our newsletter, to receive all our latest activities straight in your Inbox. We’d love to have you join us!

* This post contains affiliate link(s). An affiliate link means I may earn a referral fee or commission if you make a purchase through my link, without any extra cost to you. It helps to keep this little project afloat. Thank you so much for your support. I was not obligated to write this post or mention any particular product. All opinions are my, or my kids’ own.